Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
WETA 46
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
to say that this is the most humbling day of my life. >> rupert murdoch and his son james are in the hot seat as british lawmakers grilled them up over what they knew about the phone hacking scandal. scheduled for execution, mark stroman is set to die by lethal injection. hoping to make a splash in the london olympics, with just a year left to go, we follow one british swimmer working hard to make the cut. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. shocked, appalled, a shame, the words that british -- that rupert murdoch used before british lawmakers. he was addressing the scandal which has sent shock waves through the metropolitan police. appearing beside his son, the senior murdoch apologized for the hurt that has been caused but maintained he was not responsible. the proceedings were interrupted by a demonstrator using a plateful of foam. >> the policemen are there to protect rupert in james murdoch, not taken in for questioning. that job fell to a committee of and peace. that tycoon's wife was behind him offering physical and emotional support. his son and on
murdoch and london and paul farmer on haiti when we continue. every story needs a hero we can all root for. who beats the odds and comes out on top. but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is bned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, suppt small business. shop small. captiong snsored by rose communicaons from our studiosn new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the story of rupert mdoch and his media empire, which is under siege in london. the controversy arises from an ongoing phone hacking scandal and inappropriate relgtszships with the police. murdoch flew to london last weekend to takmaom cnd of the defense of his companyom newsco. on sunday hesh ut d t dhe newspaper involved in the scandal. the 168-year-old tabloid "news of the world." yeerday he whdrehis bid for the remaining shares of b sky b worth more than $12 million after mounting presre from the british governmen
's royal family to its former prime minister, the allegations of hacking by rupert murdoch's media empire could have a global impact. east africa's drought is labeled the world's worst, but with so many in need, why is one refugee camp in kenya completely empty? and it is a question of identity. for native americans, the system has long helped define their tribes, but times have changed. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. another day and yet more extraordinary revations in the hacking scandal surrounding rupert murdoch's media empire. first came a story that the news of the world reporters tried to buy top-secret information about the royal family from one of its protection officers. in a separate case, another murdoch paper is alleged to have targeted personal liberation of the former prime minister when he was chancellor. >> the head of state, the royal family, her and their security is the duty of the police in the royal protection branch. the integrity of those officers must surely be beyond a doubt, but this morning, i learned that "news of the world"
, including an attack on media mogul rupert murdoch by a prankster armed with a plate of shaving cream. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we examine today's proceedings where the head of news corp said he was shocked, appalled and ashamed, but not responsible for the misdeeds. we talk to john burns of "the new york times" and david folkenflik of npr. >> brown: then, we ask nuclear regulatory commission chair gregory jaczko if u.s. reactors could withstand an earthquake like the one that devastated japan. >> ifill: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on the challenges and the troubles facing one of the world's largest democracies. >> it made tremendous strides politically and economically but still struggles with corruption. >> brown: kwame holman updates the budget battles as the house and senate offer dueling plans for reducing the deficit. >> ifill: and judy woodruff explores the deadline-driven deal cutting underway with political editor david chalian. >> brown: plus, in a season of tornadoes, floods and more, we get some poetic perspec
murdoch's business apierced before members of british parliament. the session last lead it hours and apologized but insisted they knew little or nothing about the illlegal phone hacking at the newspaper, news of the world. >> first of all i'd like to say as well how sorry i am and how sorry we are to particularly the victims of the illlegal voice mailing deceptions and their families. it's a matter of great regret of mine,y father and everyone at news corporation and these are standards these actionso nolive up to the standards that our company aspires to everywhere around the world. >> i would like to say this is the most humble day of my life. >> thank you. >> i became aware as it came out. th i was absolutely shocked, appalled and ashamed when i heard about the case only two weeks ago. >> charlie: here the end of the testimony rupert murdoch was asked if he considered resigning. >> have you considered resigning. >> no. >> why not? >> because i feel that people i trusted, not saying who. i don't know what level, they let me down and i think they behaved disgracefully and betray
titillation. then it was the murdoch era. things were changing. stratified english society was breaking down, and bang, we have that. there you are. is this going to do us any damage? rupert murdoch, this scandal? >> aside from the scandal, i killed that for the journalists. if, and when, the other shoe drops on the side of the ocean, eric holder's justice department is considering subpoenas. i do not think it will be as fun and dramatic as what we have seen out of london, but i do think there is another shoe to drop here. >> i think it has sort of appalled people how close we get to our sources. in england, this was out of control, where the government was being run by a news organization. politicians were terrified of the murdoch operation. some of my friends work for him and i know something about it. they took it for granted that they would go over to downing street to talk to the prime minister. you are never going to be able to pop into the oval office and tell the president what he should do. >> i will never be accused of being too cozy with the president. part of this story is who is
to rupert murdoch's giant media empire. it's "nightly business report" for wednesday, july 13. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. late today, the aaa credit rating of the united states was officially put on notice. moody's investor service placed the government's bond rating on review for possible downgrade. without a debt deal on capitol hill, moody's points to a "small but rising risk of a short-lived default" tom, that warning comes as the federal reserve says its ready to add more fuel to the economy if the recovery runs out of gas. >> tom: susie, fed chairman ben bernanke made that pledge during his semiannual congressional testimony today. that helped investor confidence, at least initially. stocks rallied sharply during the chairman's testimony but backed off those highs as the day wore on. by the close, the dow was up just 44 points, the nas
to andrew edgecliff johon about you rupert murdoch and the news corporation case in london. >> i tell you today is not the end of the story but with the resignation of rebecca brooks on tuesday, this is a story which will run for months if not years with police investigations, judicial inquiries, lawsuits and any number of other threats still piling up against the company, but it's a significant day. >> charlie: the president's press conference, global implications for europe and the united states and the rupert murdoch case. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: every story needs a hero we can all root for. who beats the odds and comes out on top. additional funding provided by these funders: but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every da all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding pvided by these funders: captioning sponsored b rose commun
'brien. pulling the plug on a major deal. rupert murdoch's news corporation ditches its bid for bskyb. mumbai under attack again. three explosions rocked india's financial capital, killing at least 21 people. and on at libya's front line, and to counter attack by colonel gaddafi's forces against rebels advancing on tripoli. >> you can hear it. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also a round the globe. the last few days have brought in a credible reversal of fortune for rupert murdoch's media empire. today came another blow. public and political pressure, news corporation withdrew its bid for bskyb. it is another casualty of the hacking firestorm. now prime minister david cameron has announced details of a far- reaching inquiry into recent events. for more on how the deal went bust, here is the bbc business editor. a warning, there is some flash photography. >> rupert murdoch, the great news mogul, in the news for the wrong reasons. putting on a brave face before one of the great humiliations' of his career, the abandonment for his attempt to take over bskyb. here is the explo
outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the person at the paper became fairly rotten and whose action shocked the nation. the paper, which has been printed for 168 years, became indelibly linked with the worst practices in journalism. james murdoch concluded it could not be amended. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. and that this company believes in. this company has been a great investor in journalism, a greater investor in media in general, and it is something that we believe very strongly and. clearly, certain activities did not live up to those standards. that is a matter of great regret for me per
committee of parliament earlier this week. rupert murdoch got a boost when a saudi prince that was the largest share of the company outside of the murdoch family voiced his support. nick, tell us, news corp shares are up for the first time in about two weeks. but the independent directors have hired their own lawyer. or why? >> we are getting mixed signals from the board. they have hired lawyers to protect shareholder value and to guard against maybe their own exposure. there have also been some reports that some of the more independent directors are thinking about ways in which rupert murdoch could give up his title of ceo at the company. this is a board that he controls pretty firmly. >> who is on the board? >> is a funny bunch. there are board members that cover a lot of ground. there is an opera singer. quite a range of experience. they are there because he wants them to be. he can control them through loyalty or maybe they spend their entire career there. >> will the board wants him to be succeeded by another? or is it time for someone outside the family? >> i think w
who have said that police do not want to investigate what he has done. rupert murdoch issued a statement describing what had happened as deplorable and unacceptable. he stated that "our company must fully cooperate with the police and said that what happened under rebekah brooks' leadership." she was editor of the "news of the world," at the time some of the hacking. she was apparently away at the time. murdoch's enemies have long claimed that whoever is in power is the real puppet master. tonight, he, they, no one knows how this will end. >> joining me now from london is the deputy prime minister went tony blair was in power. 45 of his mobile phone messages were hacked into. this is a very sorry tale. it goes back to 2006 when your own messages were broken into. how evasive was that? >> the police kept in mind that that was so. i had to go to the court and force them to commit and setup a new inquiry. that is finding all of disinformation. the information was available before. why didn't the police act on it instead of the nine that my phone messages had been broken into? no
twitter. >> i am going to make history as the first president to live tweet. >> rupert murdoch's tabloid giant "news of the world" is dead, a shame. >> it finally breached a trust with readers. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> for the record, and unemployment rose to 9.2% last month, even though the economy added 18 at thousand jobs. still no deal on the debt limit. they are going to work over the weekend. the president and speaker boehner have been talking about a plan that would cut $4 trillion at government spending over the next 15 years, but how you do that? close tax loopholes, reduce tax deductions? what republicans ever dared to do that? will democrats ever signed onto cuts in medicare and social security? >> democrats, suck it up. put the entitlements on the table and make sure at the end of the 80's are still programs that serve the public -- at the end of the day these are still programs that serve the public. >> dick durbin. all sounds so reasonable, why can they not get done? >> i don't know why. i do know why. if you look at the polling d
: still ahead, the murdoch mess. ruper murdoch's newscorp is under scrutiny for questionable journalism on both sides of the atlantic, but we'll talk to an analyst who still likes the stock. >> susie: government debt worries put investors in a selling mood. at the close, the dow lost 94 points, the nasdaq fell nearly 25 and the s&p 500 off almost 11. as for volume, 871 million shares were traded here at the big board and just shy of 1.8 billion at the nasdaq. meanwhile, all that glitters is gold. the yellow metal closed above $1,600 for the first time. ever. gold for august delivery settled at $1,602 an ounce, up $12. that's a record in dollar terms, but below the peak reached in the 1980s, after accounting for inflation. >> susie: big layoffs announced late today at cisco systems. it will layoff 6,500 workers, or about 9% of its full time workforce. analysts predicted thousands of job cuts after cisco announced plans to reorganize in may. the company had been losing ground in the network equipment business. cisco says the move will cut annual expenses by about $1 billion. >> tom: big b
before i got to this town, and i am not through now. >> rupert murdoch call before a committee of the british parliament. >> do you accept that ultimately you are responsible for this fiasco? >> no. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> here is the deal -- as we record this program, we don't know how the debt ceiling business will play out over the weekend, but we have to put a program on the air, so here goes. president obama said this week that he hopes to elevate the tone of political discourse in washington. >> the way we run campaigns these days, the language used, the demonization of the other side, i think that has broken down some of that trust here in washington. >> anyone who witnessed his reckless spending habits over the past 2 1/2 years or sat across the negotiating table from him the past few weeks can be forgiven for being skeptical of his recent attempts to come across as a fiscal moderate. >> that is senate minority leader mitch mcconnell, who has made no secret of his hope that barack obama becomes a one-term president, but as ma
joined by a senior business writer for bloomberg news. -- this could impact the rupert murdoch empire, i am joined by a senior business writer for bloomberg news. what can they say that will reassure shareholders? >> i think shareholders will want to hear that the worst is past. there's a sense among shareholders -- viavoice given rupert murdoch -- they have always given rupert murdoch a bit of a break. there has always been a bit of a murdoch discount thinking he is going to do what he wants to do and do not always what is best for shareholders. they've given him a break because he has a good view long- term of where the company is going. now he and his management team look like a group that is not in front of the news. they continue to get hammered by events. they are not prepared for it. they're constantly reacting. i think shareholders will want to see that the worst is behind them and they have their arms around this and know where it will go from here. >> is there any threat to the murdochs themselves? are their personal reputations so damaged it is now a liability for management?
, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc news america". herber murdoch said he will appear before a british lawmakers on the phone hacking scandal. the fbi starts its own investigation in the u.s. the airline forced into hiding. a crackdown in syria continues, we cross the border to get a look at how thousands of families are living. paying a hefty price for some of jane austen's pages. an early manuscript is in the hands of the highest bidder. let me start by telling you to mark your calendars. next tuesday the embattled media titan rupert murdoch and his heir apparent jane will appear before british lawmakers. sending shock waves far and wide. the fbi has opened an investigation into allegations that murdoch's news corp. saw to hack into the phones of september 11 victims. we start tonight's coverage with this report from our deputy political editor. >> parliament has costumed the news of the -- to answer the questions of the mp's of why so many were hacked. >> my message to rebekah brooks is do the decent thing. it cannot hide away from this level of public english. >> they were reluctan
, judy. >> brown: the "news of the world" scandal in britain took new turns today. the rupert murdoch tabloid is shutting down on sunday amid allegations that reporters hacked into phones of murder victims and the families of slain soldiers. today, police in london arrested three people, including former editor andrew coulson, who once worked for prime minister david cameron. and cameron himself faced new questions. awe instead of standing in his traditional place at the back of the home watching david cameron speak, he was heading for a south london station where he was arrested and questioned on suspicion of conspiracy to hack phones and on suspicion of bribing police officers. >> i made that decision to employ andy. he had resigned from the news of the world. he said at the time he didn't know what was happening on his watch. he should have known what was happening on his watch. he paid the price. he resigned. >> david cameron hired him to run his press operation barely five months after he resigned as editor of the news of the world and the paper's royal correspondent was jailed f
brown claimed in an interview that the "sunday times" also part of the murdoch empire hire criminals to obtain the information. there is some flash photography. >> here is gordon that downing street with rupert's starter next to him and the top editor on the right. for years, team brown stayed close to t murdoch. no more. peace miles fell away. gordon brown accused them and their newspaper of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> some were getting information from my lawyers. like a tax attorney said that medical records have been broken into. i do not tell how all of this happened. in two instances, there is absolute proof that news international, was involved in hiring people to get this information. ith people that the work wa our criminals. >> this is the editor of "the sunday times." in a statement tonight, they believe ethanol law was broken, no criminal was used edie story was published giving both sides of the hearing. he attacked the way it reported that his youngest son was suffering from cystic fibrosis. the revelation was not legitimate. they left him -- >>
as newscorp c.e.o. rupert murdoch and his son james testified before parliament. a comedian stormed toward the senior murdoch, trying to hit him with a shaving cream pie. he wasn't hurt. both murdochs offered a string of apologies for the telephone hacking scandal that has engulfed their company, causing them to shut down their british tabloid "news of the world." >> this is the most humble day of my life. >> it's a mattered of great regret. mine, my father's and everyone at the news corporation. these do not live up to the standards that our company aspires to everywhere around the world. >> susie: despite the apologies, rupert murdoch said he would not step down as c.e.o., saying "i'm the best person to clean this up." shares of newscorp moved higher during the testimony. they finished the day up 5%, closing at 15.79. >> tom: very activelyl traded, really a broad rally today. let's take a look at tonight's market focus. stocks saw strong buying throughout the day thanks to earnings, thanks to positive housing numbers and hope for movement toward a deal on the debt limit. let's roll out d
-- will be its last. in sun valley, idaho today, media mogul rupert murdoch-- owner of parent company news corporation-- had no comment on the tabloid's closure. but his son james murdoch said in a statement to staffers: fundamentally, action taken a number of years ago by certain individuals, in what had been a good newsroom have breached the trust that the news of the world has with its readers. >> warner: those mistakes first came to light in 2005 when "news of the world" was accused of hacking into cell phone messages of members of the royal family and famous actors. other revelations followed, amid an ongoing but fitful police inquiry. this week, public outrage exploded with leaks from that inquiry, that the family of a murdered teenager milly dowler had been victimized. a private detective working for "news of the world" allegedly hacked her voice mail after she disappeared in 2002, and deleted some messages. the activity on her phone account gave them false hope she was still alive. then yesterday, relatives of victims of london's so-called 7/7 terror attacks in 2005 said they'd bee
hiring a former tabloid editor who's since resigned and been arrested and about rupert murdoch's aborted bid for b-sky-b-- british sky broadcasting. we start with a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: rupert murdoch flew the prime minister postponed parliament's summer break by a day to try to re-establish his own standing with a statement and debate. after two weeks of resisting pressure for a full-scale apology for hiring andy coulson david cameron edged towards one and he said people would hear the full genuine article if andy coulson was found to have lied. >> i have an old fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. but if it turns out i've been lied to that would be a moment for a profound apology. and in that event i can tell you i will not fall short. people will of course make judgements about it. of course i regret and i am extremely sorry about the furore it has caused with 20/20 hindsight and all that has followed i would not have offered him the job and i expect that he would not have taken it. but you don't make decisions in hindsig
. the rupert murdoch media empire news corporation dropped its bid today to take over british sky broadcasting. it was the latest fallout from the firestorm of allegations that murdoch tabloids hacked into phones of celebrities, royals and even murder victims. we have a report from gary gibbon of independent television news. >> reporter: for decades, he's loomed over british politics. feted by politicians, rarely denied his wishes. but today, parliament rose up as one, all three main parties united, telling rupert murdoch he could not expand his media ownership here, right now. and he buckled. in a statement on their takeover plans, news corp said thait was too difficult to progress in this climate, but that news corp reserves the right to make an offer at a later date. >> i think this is the right decision, i've been saying that this company clearly needs to sort out the problems there are at news international, at the "news of the world." that must be the priority, not takeovers, so the right >> reporter: it's a huge blow for james murdoch, third in command at his father's company. buying b-
. >> tom: the scandal surrounding rupert murdoch's newscorp has spread to the u.s. the f.b.i. has opened an investigation into whether murdoch newspapers targeted the phones of 9/11 victims. it comes as rupert murdoch and his son, james, have agreed to testify before a british parliamentary panel. next week, the group will look into phone hacking and bribery by employees of newscorp's british newspaper empire. today, rupert murdoch says his company will recover from any fallout. >> susie: small businesses are often called the engine of the nation's economy. that's why tonight's commentator believes it's key to teach the nation's kids to think like entrepreneurs. with tonight's "kids and cash," here's jack harris, president of junior achievement of georgia. >> for generations, we've been taught to believe in the american dream-- owning a house, buying a car, living the good life. but this generation of kids could be the first that might not do better financially than their parents. that's why it's so important to teach business to children at a young age. at junior achievement, we work wi
was, of course, the committee with the murdochs and rebekah brooks, but i went to the home affairs committee and sat there when the -- when the just outgoing commissioner of police and the assistant commissioner, also outgoing, and the press officer talked about their relations with the press. it was really truly extraordinary. it wasn't -- it wasn't just the statistic lionel just quoted about the -- these, you know,0 members of 45 strong team being ex-news international journalists, it was things like 30% of paul stevenson's meetings over a five-year period had been meetings with the media had been with news international journalists. it's coming out in recent days that somebody who was a senior executive at the "news of the world" also worked simultaneously, if you'll pardon the pun, as a translator for scotland yard. there was also somebody who was working both as the chief correspondent -- or chief reporter of the paper. as a police informant. so the -- there was almost no delineation at times between where news international finished around scland yard began. it was really ext
"news of the world". the rupert murdoch media conglomerate has closed the paper. and it delayed efforts today to take over another company, british sky broadcasting or, b- sky-b. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: gordon brown wooed the murdoch empire like the best of them. but they turned on him, backing david cameron in the last election. today, he turned on them. gordon brown believes his phone and that of his wife may have been hacked into by the "news of the world." he believes someone working on behalf of the "sunday times" accessed his bank account and he believes his son's medical records were obtained by the "sun" newspaper. >> that they had information that fraser had cystic fibrosis which was a matter that they the family were just getting their heads around at the time and dealing with. >> reporter: it was a fast moving day of swirling allegations, political and corporate positioning. amongst the allegations, it was suggested that royal protection officers in the police force had sold confidential royal numbers to the news of the
selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite, quite shocking, that someone could do this, actually knowing the police were trying to fin
to streetcritique@nbr.com. new pressure today for newscorp chairman rupert murdoch to abandon his bid for satellite broadcaster b. sky b. the u.k. government says it will support a non-binding motion in parliament urging newscorp to drop the deal. murdoch has also been asked to answer questions about the phone-hacking scandal surrounding his tabloid, "the news of the world." u.s. regulators say they're not investigating newscorp, but that if issues arise with any of murdoch's u.s. media properties, they will. >> tom: the much-anticipated consumer finance protection bureau will open its doors later this month. the woman setting up the agency, elizabeth warren, said the agency will begin overseeing the nation's biggest banks on july 21. specifically, it will look at how banks with more than $10 billion in assets comply with consumer finance laws. the bureau was set up as part of the dodd/frank financial overhaul passed by congress last summer. >> susie: when it comes to finding common ground in washington, tonight's commentator asks, what does it really mean to be somewhere in the middle? here's tim
for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had to find it. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."çç major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >>
murdoch. now david cameron. ?hat is the mood among mp's >> conservative mps believe the labour party are making a political capital out of this, and they are fed up. the labor party senses blood. they think the prime-sur has made in a catastrophic -- they think the prime minister has made a catastrophic misjudgment. they basically said, a plague on all your houses. do not talk about this. talk about jobs in the economy. if they can talk about it, they can jump over this and see where the british people are. the problem is the phone hacking issue is not going to go away without process, and the cocess is sethat andy oulson was arrested. there is a possibility he could face charges. david cameron faced up to what that would mean. he said, ohio the country are profound of -- i of the country a profound apology. >> umar european leaders will gather in brussels to discuss the debt crisis, and already the president has issued a sharp warning there may be- consequences if a response is not taken. >> greece and its debts are hanging over the eurozone, a country without growth and any economy
sell its $6 million share in rupert murdoch news corporation can unless the organization conducts a full and open inquiry into the recent phone hacking scandal. church leaders called the actions of murdoch's british tabloid, the news of the world, "utterly reprehensible and unethical. and finally, during its coverage of last month's u.s. open golf tournament, nbc ran a montage that included the pledge of allegiance to the flag. most of it. it left out the words "under god, indivisible. members of congress, among others, complained and nbc this week formally apologized. it said there was nothing ideological about the omission, and that the employees involved have been reprimanded. that's our program for now. i'm bob abernethy. you can follow us on twitter and facebook, find us on youtube, and watch us anytime, anywhere on smart phones and iphones. there's also much more on our web site. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available -- join us at pbs. org. as we leave you, music from the liturgy of lament, for the victims of sex ab
engulfing rupert murdoch's newscorp. now many advertisers, including ford and virgin, are bailing on the "news of the world" tabloid. the paper is under fire for intruding into private voicemails of sports and film stars, politicians and even a murder victim. murdoch said today he will keep the paper's c.e.o. rebekkah brooks in her job, despite calls for her resignation. >> tom: it took almost two decades, but the u.s. and mexico have finally signed a deal to let each other's trucks have unlimited access to each other's highways. this provision was originally part of the nafta agreement, signed back in 1994, but both countries argued for years over safety and financial issues. and there's still opposition. the teamsters union says the deal is probably illegal and opens the border to dangerous trucks. >> susie: in the "money file," making your good credit score work harder for you. here's donna rosato, senior writer at "money magazine." >> got a good credit score? you do if you've got a score of 740 or higher. just one third of americans are members of that elite club. if you're on
-torn country. >> ifill: ray suarez explores what's next for rupert murdoch's media empire, as the investigation expands into the phone hacking scandal. >> woodruff: we update budget negotiations in washington and examine the consequences if lawmakers fail to raise the debt ceiling by the august 2 deadline. >> ifill: tom bearden tells the story of citizen scientists-- some quite young-- on the hunt for ladybugs. >> oh, they're beauties. we can't keep them, sweetie. we're just going to take their picture. >> woodruff: and we reflect on the life of betty ford, as friends, family, and dignitaries gather to pay ibute to the former first lady, who died friday. >> i'm sure they will remember me in recovery and perhaps with equal rights amendment. if i hadn't been married to my husband, i never would have had the voice that i did. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternat
there are further allegations in the phone hacking scandal which has rocked the murdoch media empire. police have told the mother of a child that she was on the list of people whose phone may have been hacked. notes of her phone number was on an investigate's notes. the bbc's report. >> perhaps it seemed this astonishing affair no longer had the reputation to shock. but the mother who worked alongside the news of the world alongside its former editor was all along one of its victims. sarah payne's charity was contacted last night to be told her details were in the notebooks of the phone hacker. it says "we are all deeply disappointed and we are just working to get her through it." the last night of "the news of the world" and it's last edition. sarah payne had previously been told she was not a hacking victim. she had been asked to write a last article. she described the paper as an old friend. >> a series of tragic news stories -- >> and rebecca brooks, former editor, describes sarah payne as her dear friend. the two worked together to campaign for "sarah's law," the public right to know where p
to the u.s. today. it was widely reported that the f.b.i. is investigating whether a rupert murdoch tabloid in london tried to access voicemails of 9/11 victims. and murdoch defended his handling of the scandal, speaking to "the wall street journal," which he also owns. he said he's just getting annoyed at all the criticism of his company. a federal judge in washington has declared a mistrial just two days into the perjury trial of baseball great roger clemens. the judge acted after prosecutors showed the jury some evidence that had already been disallowed. clemens is accused of lying to congress when he said he never used steroids. he had nothing to say as he left the courthouse. the judge set a september hearing to decide on holding a new trial. a suicide bomber in afghanistan killed five people today at a memorial service for ahmed wali karzai-- half-brother of the afghan president. the bomber blew himself up at ae kandahar mosque where the service was under way. president karzai was not attending. the attack came as a u.n. report said afghan civilian deaths are up 15 percent from a year
't tell policy and the murdoch scandal. you can find it at pbs.org. keep up with daily developments including fallout from the attacks in norway. we will meet you again right here next week on washington week. good night. >> funding for washington week is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> help troops see danger before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. around the globe, the people of boeing are working to the to support and protect all who serve. that's why we're here. >> corporate funding something also provided by prudential financial. at&t, rethink possible. additional funding for washington week is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs s ktion from v ie you. thank you. vo:geico, committed to providing service to its auto insurance customers for over 70 years. more information on auto insurance at geico.com or 1-800-947-auto any time of the day or night.
," a murdoch paper, for having published stories that claim she's a prostitute. so she wanted to come out and say, look, most of the world, maybe not in the united states, but most of the world knows my name. most people know who i am, my daughter, 15 years old, is reading stories in the "new york post" that say i'm a prostitute. i think it's time to come out and defend myself in public and i think that's exactly why she did it. >> christopher dickie, thank you very much for joining us. now to the up in nuptials whiche been taking place across new york. yesterday, the state became the largest in the u.s. to recognize gay marriage and officials are hoping that with all of those weddings, the economy will be given a much-needed boost. the bbc's laura travallian went to meet happy couples. >> last minute caches on the big day for hundreds of same-sex couples queuing up in the sweltering heat, this was a moment to treasure. in a new york first, alese and her fiancee planned a double wedding with alese's brother and his partner. >> a month ago on the couch because i don't think you realize how
scandal surrounding rupert murdoch's newscorp continues to grow. his next deal could be in jeopardy. the british government is taking a tougher stance on newscorp's proposed takeover of satellite television company british sky broadcasting. the deal has come under a full- scale inquiry by britain's competition commission. separately, newscorp today withdrew its offer to spin off sky news if the b. sky b. deal is approved. >> susie: while washington is focused on the debt debate, tonight's commentator wants to have a bigger conversation about growth. he's glenn hubbard, dean of the graduate school of business at columbia and former top economic advisor to president george w. bush. >> our current national debate over fiscal austerity masks a conversation we need to have about growth-- to raise incomes and create jobs. faster growth doesn't just happen. a supportive policy environment is needed. we need to encourage participation in the workforce and to provide education and training that match the skills required for today and tomorrow. the productivity of our workforce also depends o
the years. are you suggesting that the story of murdoch's possible downfall is yet another tabloid story, a tabloid story about a tabloid story? >> rose: tt's moreshakespearean. >> perhaps. >> rose: so tell me about joyce. w did you know about her? >> i read a lot of newspapers. this was an a.p. service wire story about a woman who had cloned her -- >> rose: dog.-- pit bull named , produced five -- five clones. her name is bernand mckinney, but at the bottom of the article they mentioned she might have been involved -- she might be joyce mckinney, she might involved in a 30-year-old sex and chain story. >> rose: sex and chain?sex and . >> rose: chained to a bed?yes. and it caught my attention. i ended up making a movie about it. >> rose: were you looking for ay jumped up at you? >> i'm always looking for stories. i mean, that's nothing unusual. this story jumped out at me. i had been thinking of doing a tabloid story. that had been on my mind. one of the characters in my movie "tabloid" describes that is t perfect tablo story. i believe they'r absolutely correct. >> rose: when makes the
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)